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Spring harvest opportunities

Introduction

     During 2000 and 2001, GLIFWC staff interviewed tribal elders regarding non-medicinal uses of plants. With approval from the elders, we have decided to share this information in the form of a harvest calendar.

     In this section, the harvest calendar is devoted to those plants that may be gathered for non-medicinal uses during the upcoming ziigwan (spring) months of onaabani-giizis, hard crust on the snow moon (March); iskigamizige-giizis, maple sugar moon (April); and waabigwanii-giizis, flower moon (May).

 

Tree Sap flower

sugar, syrup, candy

ininaatig wiishkobaaboo—sugar maple sap

zhiishiigimiiwanzh waboo—red maple sap

adjagobimak waboo—box elder sap

wiigwaas mitig waboo—paper (white) birch sap

wiinizik waaboo—yellow birch sap

wadoop mitig waboo—alder sap

 

Sap Processing Utensils flower

boughs used to stop sap boil over;

wood used for tree taps and sap stirring paddles

zhingob waatigwaanan—balsam fir boughs

zhingob waatigwaanan—black spruce boughs

gaawaandag waatigwaanan—white spruce boughs

giizhik waatigwaanan—white cedar boughs

giizhik misan—white cedar wood

wiigob misan—basswood wood

moozo gawinzh misan—moosewood wood

apaakwaanaatig misan—sumac wood

 

Greens and Flowers flower

raw, sauteed, steamed, boiled, deep fried, soup

waagaagan—ferns (young shoots)

nessibag aniibiishan—clover leaves

__waabigoniin aniibiishan—cowslips leaves

doodooshaaboojiibik aniibiishan—dandelion leaves

bagwaji zhigaagawinzhiig aniibiishan—wild leek leaves

__shaaboosigan aniibiishan—milkweed leaves

*watercress leaves

*pigweed leaves

*aster leaves

anajiiminan—wild peas

*beach peas

datgaagmin inaskoon—thimbleberry stems

apakweshkway inaskoon—cattail stems

*wild asparagus stems

apakweshkway waabigwaniin—cattail flowers

doodooshaaboojiibik waabigwaniin—dandelin flowers

bibigwemin waabigwaniin—elderberry flowers

wazhaskwedoonsag—morel mushrooms

 

__Must be properly prepared, see disclaimer.

 

Fruits flower

raw, jams, jellies, pie fillings

ode-iminan—strawberries

 

Roots flower

roasted, sauteed, steamed, boiled

waabiziipin ojiibikan—arrowhead (moose ears) roots

oga'damun ojiibikan—yellow water lily roots

bagwaji zhigaagawinzhiig—wild leeks

bagwaji zhigaagananzhiig—wild onions

apakweshkway ojiibikan—cattail roots

anaakanashk ojiibikan—bulrush roots

anaakanashk ojiibikan—rush roots

doodooshaaboojiibikan ojiibikan—dandelion roots

namepin ojiibikan—wild ginger roots

 

Miigwech to those speakers in Mille Lacs, Minnesota and Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin for their help in providing us with the Ojibwe names for these plants.

 

*We have been unable to find the names for these plants in Ojibwemowin.

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Tea flower

de'imin aniibiishan—strawberry leaves

apakwanagemag aniibiishan—red pine leaves (new growth)

wiinisiibag aniibiishan—wintergreen leaves

mashkigobag aniibiishan—swamp (Labrador) tea leaves

kaakaagiwanzh aniibiishan—hemlock leaves

zhingob aniibiishan—balsam fir leaves

giizhik aniibiishan—white cedar leaves

mishkomin mitigosan—raspberry stems

okwemin nagek—black cherry bark

asasawemin wategwaanan—choke cherry twigs

wiinzik—yellow birch bud tips

wiigwaas mitig—white (paper) birch bud tips

doodooshaaboojiibik ojiibikan—dandelion roots

 

Tobacco flower

nessibag aniibishan—clover leaves

doodooshaaboojiibik aniibishan—dandelion leaves

bagaaniminzh aniibishan—hazelnut leaves

datgaawanzh aniibishan—thimbleberry leaves

wiinisiibag aniibiishan—wintergreen leaves

*pigweed leaves

miskwaabiimizh aniibishan—red willow (kinnickinnick) bark

wiigob ojiibikan—basswood roots

 

Insect Repellents flower

giizhik aniibishan—white cedar leaves

miskwaabiimizh waaboo—red willow sap

 

Decorations flower

*trailing arbutus flowers

oziisigobimizh waabigwaniin—pussy willow flowers

 

wiigwaas—paper (white) birch bark flower

lodges, baskets, containers, canoes, caskets, scoops, cradle boards, ornaments, firestarter

 

 

Disclaimer

     While the list identifies those plants that can be harvested during the summer months, we strongly recommend that before you pick them, you meet with elders in your community to talk about proper ways of harvesting, times of harvesting and proper preparation of the plants before eating them.

     This is important because some plants need to be harvested in certain ways to ensure that they will continue to grow, while other plants need to be properly washed and prepared prior to eating or using them. In addition, those elders can also help you in different uses of these plants.

 

 

 

Summer harvest opportunities

Introduction

     During 2000 and 2001, GLIFWC staff interviewed tribal elders regarding non-medicinal uses of plants. With approval from the elders, we have decided to share this information in the form of a harvest calendar.

     In this section, the harvest calendar is devoted to those plants that may be gathered for non-medicinal uses during the upcoming summer months of ode'imini- giizis, time for picking strawberry moon (June); aabita-niibino-giizis, half way through the summer moon (July); and manoominike-giizis, ricing moon (August).

 

Fruits and Nuts flower

raw, jams, jellies, pie fillings, breads, pancakes

miskominan—raspberries

oshkizhaanimuk—dewberries

odaatagaagominag—blackberries

miinan—blueberries

ode'iminan—strawberries

gozigaakominag—juneberries

bibigweminan—elderberries

datgaagminan—thimbleberries

*black haw berries

ookweminan—black cherries

asasaweminan—choke cherries

bawe'iminan—pin cherries

sewa'kominan—sand cherries

zhaabominan—currants

bagwaji bagesaanag—wild plums

bagaan—hazelnuts

 

Packing Materials flower

for berry gathering

waagoga—ferns

aasaakamigoon—mosses

 

Grains flower

casseroles, soups, breads, pancakes

manoomin—wild rice

 

Roots flower

roasted, sauteed, steamed, boiled

bagwaji zhigaagawinzhiig—wild leeks

bagwaji zhigaagananzhiig—wild onions

apakweshkway ojiibikan—cattail roots

anaakanashk ojiibikan—bulrush roots

anaakanashk ojiibikan—rush roots

doodooshaaboojiibikan ojiibikan—dandelion roots namepin

ojiibikan—wild ginger roots

 

Greens flower

raw, sauteed, steamed, boiled

*watercress leaves

*pigweed leaves

*aster leaves

*beach peas

anajiiminan—wild peas

 

Disclaimer

     While the list identifies those plants that can be harvested during the summer months, we strongly recommend that before you pick them, you meet with elders in your community to talk about proper ways of harvesting, times of harvesting and proper preparation of the plants before eating them.

     This is important because some plants need to be harvested in certain ways to ensure that they will continue to grow, while other plants need to be properly washed and prepared prior to eating or using them. In addition, those elders can also help you in different uses of these plants.

 

 

Miigwech to those speakers in Mille Lacs, Minnesota and Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin for their help in providing us with the Ojibwe names for these plants.

 

*We have been unable to find the names for these plants in Ojibwemowin.

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Tea flower

namewashkoons aniibiishan—spearmint leaves

*peppermint leaves

ozaawaaskined aniibiishan—horsemint leaves

sasap kwanins aniibiishan—wild bergamot leaves

miskomin(an) aniibiishan—raspberry leaves

ode'imin aniibiishan—strawberry leaves

odaatagaagomin aniibiishan—blackberry leaves

miinan aniibiishan—blueberry leaves

apakwanagemag aniibiishan—red pine leaves (new growth)

wiinisiibag aniibiishan—wintergreen leaves

mashkigobag aniibiishan—swamp (Labrador) tea leaves

kaakaagiwanzh aniibiishan—hemlock leaves

zhingob aniibiishan—balsam fir leaves

giizhik aniibiishan—white cedar leaves

nessibag waabigwaniin—clover flowers

sasap kwanins waabigwaniin—wild bergamot flowers

doodooshaaboojiibik waabigwaniin—dandelion flowers

miskominan—raspberries

ode'iminan—strawberries

sewa'kominan—sand cherries

apaakwaanaatig miinesan—sumac fruits

asasaweminan—choke cherries

mishkomin mitigosan—raspberry stems

ookwemin nagek—black cherry bark

asasawemin wategwaanan—choke cherry twigs

wiinzik—yellow birch bud tips

wiigwaas mitig—white (paper) birch bud tips

manoomin—wild rice (ground up)

gagige bag—princess pine

jiisens ojiibikan—ginseng roots

doodooshaaboojiibik ojiibikan—dandelion roots

wiigob ojiibikan—basswood roots

 

Wine flower

doodooshaaboojiibik waabiginiin—dandelion flowers

mashkiigiminag—cranberries

bibigweminan—elderberries

asasaweminan—choke cherries

zhaabomin—currants

 

Cold juices and drinks flower

miskominan—raspberries

odaatagaagominag—blackberries

miinan—blueberries

ode'iminan—strawberries

asasaweminan—choke cherries

bawe'iminan—pin cherries

mushkigominag—cranberries bagwaji

bagesaan—wild plums

bagwaj zhoominan—wild grapes

zhaabominan—currants

apaakwaanaatig miinesan—sumac fruits

ozaawaaskined nibi—honeysuckle flower nectar

 

Fall harvest opportunities

Introduction

     During 2000 and 2001, GLIFWC staff interviewed tribal elders regarding non-medicinal uses of plants. With approval from the elders, we have decided to share this information in the form of a harvest calendar.

     In this section, the harvest calendar is devoted to those plants that may be gathered for non-medicinal uses during the upcoming fall months of waatebagaa- giizis, leaves changing color moon (September); binaakwii-giizis, falling leaves moon (October); and gashkadino-giizis, ice is forming moon (November).

 

Fruits and Nuts flower

raw, jams, jellies, pie fillings, breads, pancakes

atiteminan—nannyberries

mashkiigiminag—cranberries

aniibiiminan—highbush cranberries

miinesag—hawthorn berries

asasaweminan—chokecherries

bagwaj zhoominan—wild grapes

 

Nuts flower

raw, roasted, flour, pie fillings

waawiye bagaanag—black walnuts

bagaanaak bagaanag—butternuts

wakikaanag bagaanag—pine nuts

bagaanag—hazelnuts

mitigwaabaak bagaanag—hickory nuts

mitigomizh bagaanag—oak acorns

 

Grains flower

casseroles, soups, breads, pancakes

manoomin—wild rice

 

Roots flower

roasted, sauteed, steamed, boiled

waabiziipin ojiibikan—arrowhead roots

okadaakoon—wild carrots

oga'da mun ojiibikan—yellow waterlily roots

bagwaji zhigaagawinzhiig—wild leeks

bagwaji zhigaagananzhiig—wild onions

apakweshkway ojiibikan—cattail roots

anaakanashk ojiibikoon—bulrush roots

anaakanashk ojiibikoon—rush roots

 

Greens flower

raw, sauteed, steamed, boiled

*watercress leaves

 

Tea flower

oginiig—rosehips

apaakwaanaatig miinesan—sumac fruits

wiinisiibag miinesan—wintergreen berries

wiinisiibag aniibiishan—wintergreen leaves

mashkigobag aniibiishan—swamp tea leaves

kaakaagiwanzh aniibiishan—hemlock leaves

zhingob aniibiishan—balsam fir leaves

giizhik aniibiishan—white cedar leaves

okwemin nagek—black cherry bark

asasawemin wategwaanan—choke cherry twigs

gagige bag—princess pine

 

Disclaimer

     While the list identifies those plants that can be harvested during the summer months, we strongly recommend that before you pick them, you meet with elders in your community to talk about proper ways of harvesting, times of harvesting and proper preparation of the plants before eating them.

     This is important because some plants need to be harvested in certain ways to ensure that they will continue to grow, while other plants need to be properly washed and prepared prior to eating or using them. In addition, those elders can also help you in different uses of these plants.

 

 

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Cold beverages flower

asasaweminan—choke cherries

bagwaj zhoominan—wild grapes

apaakwaanaatig miinesan—sumac fruits

mashkiigiminag—cranberries

 

Utility items flower

mazaanaatigoons—nettle stems (twine)

giiziso-mashkiki inaskoon—goldenrods stems (pipes)

apakweshkway waabigwaniin—cattail flowers (torches)

nookwezigan waabigwaniin—fleabane flowers (smoke attracts deer bucks)

oziisigobimizh wadikwanan—willow branches (baskets)

apakweshkway aninbiishan—cattail leaves (weaving)

anaakanashk inaskoon—bulrush stems (weaving)

*angelica stems (whistles)

 

Ceremonial items flower

miskwaabiimizh aniibishan—red willow bark (tobacco)

wiigob ojiibikan—basswood roots (tobacco)

giizhik aniibiishan—white cedar leaves (smudge)

mashkodewashk aniibiishan—wild sage leaves (smudge)

apaakwaanaatig inaskoon—sumac stems (pipe stems)

 

Commercial products flower

gagige bag—princess pine

zhingob waatigwaanan—balsam fir boughs

wakikaandag gomizhomin—pine cones

 

Miigwech to those speakers in Mille Lacs, Minnesota and Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin for their help in providing us with the Ojibwe names for these plants.

 

*We have been unable to find the names for these plants in Ojibwemowin.

 

nannyberry

atiteminan—nannyberries

 

Winter harvest opportunities

Introduction

     During 2000 and 2001, GLIFWC staff interviewed tribal elders regarding non-medicinal uses of plants. With approval from the elders, we have decided to share this information in the form of a harvest calendar.

     In this section,the harvest calendar is devoted to those plants that may be gathered for non-medicinal uses during the upcoming biboon (winter) months of manidoo-giizisoons, little spirit moon (December); gichi-manidoo-giizis, great spirit moon (January); and namebini-giizis, sucker moon (February). All of these plants may be gathered during any season unless otherwise specified.

 

Fruits flower

raw, jams

aniibiiminan—highbush cranberries (fall and winter)

 

Tea flower

oginiig—rosehips (fall and winter)

apaakwaanaatig miinesan—sumac fruits (fall and winter)

wiinisiibag aniibiishan—wintergreen leaves

mashkigobag aniibiishan—swamp tea leaves

kaakaagiwanzh aniibiishan—hemlock leaves

zhingob aniibiishan—balsam fir leaves

giizhik aniibiishan—white cedar leaves

okwemin nagek—black cherry bark

gagige bag—princess pine

 

Ceremonial items flower

miskwaabiimizh aniibishan—red willow bark (tobacco)

wiigob ojiibikan—basswood roots (tobacco)

giizhik aniibiishan—white cedar leaves (smudge)

 

Utility items flower

okikaandag ojiibikan—jack pine roots (lacing)

zhingobaandag ojiibikan—black spruce roots (lacing)

zhingob waatigwaanan—balsam fir boughs (bedding)

giizhik waatigwaanan—white cedar boughs (bedding)

giiziso-mashkiki—goldenrod stems (pipes)

*angelica stems (Whistles)

apakweshkway waabigwaniin—cattail flowers (torches)

aasaakamig—moss (insulation, diaper lining)

wazhashkwedo—white birch fungus (air freshener, fire starter)

 

Ceremonial items flower

wreaths, baskets

zhingob waatigwaanan—balsam fir boughs

giizhik waatigwaanan—white cedar boughs

wakikaandag gomizhomin—pine cones

oziisigobimizh wadikwanan—willow branches

 

 

rosehips

Oginiig (rosehips) can be gathered in the fall and winter to make a delicious tea.

 

 

Miigwech to those speakers in Mille Lacs, Minnesota and Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin for their help in providing us with the Ojibwe names for these plants.

 

*We have been unable to find the names for these plants in Ojibwemowin.

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Hair conditioners flower

giizhik aniibishan —white cedar leaves

bagwaji zhoomin biimaakwadoon—wild grape vines

 

Wood products flower

firewood and kindling for heat and for smoking food and hides, sleds, cradleboards, skis, snowshoe frames, drum frames, basket frames, lodge poles, push poles, flutes, whistles, fish decoys, bows, lacrosse sticks, rice sticks, dancing sticks, taps for sap gathering, paddles for stirring sap, furniture, crafts

oginiigmanananoos misan—ironwood wood

moozo gawinzh misan—moosewood wood

mitigomizh misan—oak wood

apakwanagemag misan—red pine wood

zhingwaak misan—white pine wood

zhiishiigimiiwanzh misan—red maple wood

ininaatig misan—sugar maple wood

aagimaak misan—black ash wood

baapaagimaak misan—white ash wood

oziisigobimizh misan—willow wood

azaadi misan—aspen wood

azaadi misan—cottonwood wood

apaakwaanaatig misan—sumac wood

mashkiigwaatig misan—tamarack wood

giizhik misan—white cedar wood

wiigob misan—basswood wood

zhingob misan—balsam fir wood

wadoop misan—alder wood

 

Pitch flower

chewing gum, sealant

okikaandag bigiw—jack pine pitch

zhingob bigiw—balsam fir pitch

kaakaagiwanzh bigiw—hemlock pitch

apakwanagemag bigiw—red pine pitch

zhingwaak bigiw—white pine pitch

 

Disclaimer

     While the list identifies those plants that can be harvested during the summer months, we strongly recommend that before you pick them, you meet with elders in your community to talk about proper ways of harvesting, times of harvesting and proper preparation of the plants before eating them.

     This is important because some plants need to be harvested in certain ways to ensure that they will continue to grow, while other plants need to be properly washed and prepared prior to eating or using them. In addition, those elders can also help you in different uses of these plants.